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11 Homemade Face Masks For Natural Glowing Skin

Why try expensive beauty products laden with chemicals when you can achieve glowing skin naturally? Everyday foods like banana, carrot, yogurt, besan, turmeric, etc. contain a host of nutrients and properties that lighten scars and blemishes, protect against UV damage, exfoliate skin, and prevent premature skin aging leaving you with healthy glowing skin.

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Who doesn’t dream of having beautiful, radiant, healthy skin? According to Ayurveda, maintaining the beauty of your skin involves balancing the three doshas – vata, pitta, and kapha. Proper functioning of

  • kapha keeps your skin moisturized
  • pitta is associated with hormonal activities which affect your skin
  • vata is related to the effective circulation of nutrients to the layers of your skin

Ayurveda incorporates elements of skin care into the daily routine (dinacharya), taking care to tweak the routine according to the season. Ayurvedic literature offers a treasure trove of herbs and other natural ingredients that can benefit your skin. Let’s take a look at a few home remedies that can offer you radiant, beautiful skin.

1. Mulethi

In Ayurveda, mulethi or licorice is characterized as a ‘varnya’ herb. That is, it improves your complexion and the texture of your skin. Research indicates that it:

  • Helps with eczema: Eczema can give you inflamed, itchy skin that looks blotchy.[1][ Atopic Dermatitis](https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/atopic-dermatitis#tab-overview “Atopic Dermatitis”). National Institutes of Health. One study looked at the effect of using mulethi extract topically for this condition. Over two weeks mulethi was found to be effective at reducing swelling, reddening and itching.[2]Saeedi, Muadhamm, K. Morteza‐Semnani, and M‐R. Ghoreishi. “The treatment of atopic dermatitis with licorice gel.” Journal of Dermatological Treatment 14, no. 3 (2003): 153-157.
  • Helps fade blemishes and suntans: Spots, marks, and discoloration can detract from a radiant complexion. But mulethi can help even out your skin tone. How does it work? A pigment called melanin is responsible for your skin color. The more melanin you have, the darker your skin tone. And when a small bit gets hyperpigmented you get a dark spot. But Mulethi contains a compound called glabridin which can inhibit melanin production. So it can help you fade not just dark spots but even a sun tan.[3]Yokota, Tomohiro, Hiroyuki Nishio, Yasuo Kubota, and Masako Mizoguchi. “The inhibitory effect of glabridin from licorice extracts on melanogenesis and inflammation.” Pigment cell research … Continue reading
  • Helps with acne and acne scars: Mulethi acts against acne causing bacteria present on your skin. Moreover, it also has antioxidant anti-inflammatory effects and can also help erase dark spots and blemishes due to acne to give you a smooth, even toned complexion.[4]Raoufinejad, Kosar, and Mehdi Rajabi. “Licorice in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris and Postinflammatory Hyperpigmentation: A Review.” Journal of Pharmaceutical Care (2020).
How To Use Mulethi
  • For oily skin: Blend mulethi powder and water to prepare a paste. Leave it on your face for around 5 to 15 minutes before washing it off. You can also add an equal quantity of red sandalwood powder to up the power of this face pack.
  • For dry skin: Mix 5 grams of mulethi powder with 10-15 drops of kumkumadi taila. Leave it on for 5 to 15 minutes before washing it off. You can use this pack once or twice a day.
  • For combination skin: Mix mulethi powder with rose water or raw cow milk to form a paste. Leave it on for 5 to 15 minutes before washing it off. You can use this pack once a week.
Precaution While Using Mulethi
  • Always do a patch test on a small area of the skin to make sure you are not allergic to the ingredient.

2. Turmeric

A common spice found in almost every kitchen, turmeric can do wonders for your skin. According to Ayurveda, it can balance all three doshas – vata, pitta, and kapha.

  • Offers protection from sun damage: Research indicates that turmeric can offer your skin protection from sun damage. One study found that applying a turmeric extract prevented the formation of wrinkles and the reduction of skin elasticity in skin exposed to UVB rays.[5]Sumiyoshi, Maho, and Yoshiyuki Kimura. “Effects of a turmeric extract (Curcuma longa) on chronic ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin damage in melanin-possessing hairless mice.” … Continue reading
  • Helps fade suntans and dark spots: Studies show that curcumin, a compound present in turmeric can inhibit the production of melanin. So it can be helpful in roving a sun tan or lightening dark spots.[6]Tu, Cai‐Xia, Mao Lin, Shan‐Shan Lu, Xiao‐Yi Qi, Rong‐Xin Zhang, and Yun‐Ying Zhang. “Curcumin inhibits melanogenesis in human melanocytes.” Phytotherapy Research 26, no. 2 … Continue reading
  • May ward off hair regrowth: Though it hasn’t been scientifically validated for this property, turmeric has traditionally been used to counter unwanted hair growth.
How To Use Turmeric
  • Blend turmeric powder with yogurt or water to make a face pack. Wash it off as it dries. Do note that turmeric can stain your skin giving it a yellow tinge. This tends to fade a couple of days later.[7]Dueep Singh, John Davidson. Introduction to Ayurveda – Keeping Healthy the Ancient Way. Mendon Cottage Books. 2015
  • You can also mash 1 teaspoon of fresh turmeric and mix it with 2 teaspoons of aloe vera gel to prepare a face mask. 10 minutes after mixing these ingredients apply it to your face and leave it on for 45-60 minutes before rinsing it off. This face mask is great for blemishes and acne scars.
  • Ayurvedic practitioners advocate applying a paste of turmeric powder and water to your skin after hair removal. Leave it for 10 to 15 minutes before washing it off. This is thought to delay hair regrowth. Turmeric also has anti-microbial properties and can help heal small nicks or cuts that you might get during hair removal.
Precaution While Using Turmeric
  • Do test all new skin care ingredients for an allergic reaction on a small patch of skin before applying it to your face.

3. Pomegranate

Pomegranates are famed for their many health benefits. They’re great for your heart and can lower cholesterol levels and blood pressure. According to Ayurveda, sweet pomegranate helps balance all three doshas – vata, pitta, and kapha. However, sour pomegranate balances vata and kapha, but aggravates pitta. They are thought to improve digestion, treat certain kinds of fever as well as improve your complexion. Let’s take a look at what these juicy fruits can do for your skin. Pomegranates:

  • Have an anti-aging effect on skin: One animal study studied the effect of having pomegranate juice on mice exposed to UVB radiation for fifteen weeks. Pomegranate juice significantly lessened the development of wrinkles and improved skin water content and collagen.[8]Kang, Su‑Jin, Beom‑Rak Choi, Seung‑Hee Kim, Hae‑Yeon Yi, Hye‑Rim Park, Chang‑Hyun Song, Sae‑Kwang Ku, and Young‑Joon Lee. “Beneficial effects of dried pomegranate juice … Continue reading Collagen is a protein which gives your skin firmness and elasticity. Unfortunately, as we age, we produce less collagen and our skin becomes less firm and elastic.[9]Reilly, David M., and Jennifer Lozano. “Skin collagen through the lifestages: Importance for skin health and beauty.” Plastic and Aesthetic Research 8 (2021).
  • Fight sun damage: Pomegranates are a potent source of antioxidants. And research indicates that consuming these fruits can give your skin some protection against damage caused by exposure to the sun.[10]Henning, Susanne M., Jieping Yang, Ru-Po Lee, Jianjun Huang, Mark Hsu, Gail Thames, Irene Gilbuena et al. “Pomegranate juice and extract consumption increases the resistance to UVB-induced … Continue reading
How To Use Pomegranates
  • Juice up some pomegranates for a healthy drink. Or crack open a fruit and enjoy this fruit as a snack.
  • Try a pomegranate face mask. To prepare the mask, combine three tablespoons of pomegranate seeds, a cup of oatmeal (cooked), two tablespoons of olive oil (extra virgin organic) and a tablespoon of honey. Let it sit for around 10 minutes after applying it to your face and then wash off gently with warm water.
Precautions While Using Pomegranates
  • Pomegranates are typically safe to consume. However, some people may be allergic to it.
  • Always do a patch test on a small area of the skin to make sure you are not allergic to the ingredient.
  • Pomegranates can interact with some medicines such as certain immunosuppressants, calcium channel blockers, medicines used for treating high cholesterol levels etc. Consult with your doctor to know if any medication you’re on interacts with pomegranates before consuming it.[11][What Is Pomegranate Juice?](https://www.verywellhealth.com/pomegranate-juice-may-interact-with-certain-medications-89171 “What Is Pomegranate Juice?”). Verywell Health.

4. Shatavari

Asparagus racemosus or shatavari has always been valued for its medicinal properties. But do keep in mind that this is not the asparagus that’s usually eaten as a vegetable. That’s Asparagus officinalis.

Shatavari is considered a female tonic in Ayurveda and it’s used to treat a range of conditions from dysentery to conjunctivitis.[12]Hasan, Noorul, Nesar Ahmad, Shaikh Zohrameena, Mohd Khalid, and Juber Akhtar. “Asparagus racemosus: For medicinal uses & pharmacological actions.” International Journal of Advanced … Continue reading So, how does it help your skin? It

  • Helps ward off wrinkles: According to one study, the application of shatavari was effective in preventing wrinkle formation in adult volunteers.[13]Rungsanga, Tammanoon, Punpimol Tuntijarukornb, Kornkanok Ingkaninanc, and Jarupa Viyocha. “Stability and clinical effectiveness of emulsion containing Asparagus racemosus root extract.” … Continue reading
  • Helps fade blemishes and sun tans: Research indicates that shatavari extracts can inhibit the production of the pigment melanin. This means that they can be useful in tacking hyperpigmentation, dark spots, and blemishes.[14]Therdphapiyanak, Narin, Montree Jaturanpinyo, Neti Waranuch, Lalana Kongkaneramit, and Narong Sarisuta. “Development and assessment of tyrosinase inhibitory activity of liposomes of Asparagus … Continue reading
How to use Shatavari
  • As a face mask: Add shatavari powder to milk or honey to make a face mask. Apply it to your face and let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes before washing it off.

5. Banana

Delicious, easy to eat bananas can also be good for your skin. They

  • Help fade suntans and blemishes: According to a study banana peel extracts were effective at inhibiting the production of melanin, the pigment responsible for hyperpigmentation.[15]Phacharapiyangkul, Naphichaya, Krit Thirapanmethee, Khanit Sa-Ngiamsuntorn, Uraiwan Panich, Che-Hsin Lee, and Mullika Traidej Chomnawang. “Effect of sucrier banana peel extracts on inhibition … Continue reading
  • Help counter sun damage: One study found that mice exposed to UVB rays experienced less oxidative stress when they were fed bananas. Oxidative stress due to exposure to the Sun can lead to premature skin aging, inflammation, and even skin cancer.[16]Albrecht, S., S. Jung, R. Müller, J. Lademann, T. Zuberbier, L. Zastrow, C. Reble, I. Beckers, and M. C. Meinke. “Skin type differences in solar‐simulated radiation‐induced oxidative … Continue reading [17]Leerach, Nontaphat, Swanya Yakaew, Preeyawass Phimnuan, Wichuda Soimee, Wongnapa Nakyai, Witoo Luangbudnark, and Jarupa Viyoch. “Effect of Thai banana (Musa AA group) in reducing accumulation … Continue reading
How To Use Bananas
  • Blend a clean banana peel with a little honey and lemon juice. Apply to your face and rinse off after 10-15 minutes.
  • Mash a ripe banana and:
    • add with small amount of lemon/orange juice to lighten scars
    • add honey to counter oily skin
    • add yogurt to moisturize your skin
Precautions While Using Bananas
  • According to Ayurveda, bananas are difficult to digest. So people with poor digestion (or low digestive agni) should limit their consumption.
  • Do test all new skin care ingredients for an allergic reaction on a small patch of skin before applying it to your face.

6. Frankincense

Frankincense has been valued in traditional medicinal systems for its expectorant, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic properties.[18]Al-Yasiry, Ali Ridha Mustafa, and Bożena Kiczorowska. “Frankincense-therapeutic properties.” Advances in Hygiene & Experimental Medicine/Postepy Higieny i Medycyny Doswiadczalnej 70 … Continue reading It offers great benefits for your skin too. Frankincense essential oil which is obtained from the resin the frankincense tree can

  • Helps keep skin supple: As we age our skin tends to lose its suppleness and becomes less elastic. A protein known as elastin keeps your skin supple. And studies show that boswellic acids present in frankincense oil act against elastase, which is an enzyme that breaks down elastin.[19]Thring, Tamsyn SA, Pauline Hili, and Declan P. Naughton. “Anti-collagenase, anti-elastase and anti-oxidant activities of extracts from 21 plants.” BMC complementary and alternative … Continue reading
  • Erases fine lines and counters sun damage: One study used a slit face study to look at the effects of boswellic acids obtained from Frankincense on skin. It was found that when a cream containing boswellic acids was applied on one side of the face that side showed improvements in fine lines and the effects of photoaging (signs of aging brought on by exposure to the harmful rays of the sun).[20]Calzavara‐Pinton, Piergiacomo, Cristina Zane, Elena Facchinetti, Rossana Capezzera, and Alessandra Pedretti. “Topical Boswellic acids for treatment of photoaged skin.” Dermatologic … Continue reading
  • Soothes skin inflammation: Many skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis are characterized by inflammation. One study found that applying a cream containing boswellic acids eases reddening and scaling of skin and reduced itching in people with inflammatory skin conditions.[21]Togni, Stefano, Giada Maramaldi, Francesco Di Pierro, and Massimo Biondi. “A cosmeceutical formulation based on boswellic acids for the treatment of erythematous eczema and psoriasis.” … Continue reading
How To Use Frankincense
  • Dilute frankincense oil with a carrier oil such as almond or grapeseed oil and apply to your skin.
  • You can even add a few drops of this amazing oil to your moisturizer and make it a part of your skin care regimen.[22]Alexander, Skye. Aromatherapy Card Deck: 50 Fragrances That Soothe Your Mood, Calm Your Mind, and Heal Your Body. Fair Winds Press, 2010.
Precaution While Using Frankincense
  • Do test all new skin care ingredients for an allergic reaction on a small patch of skin before applying it to your face.

7. Carrot

According to Ayurveda carrots are easy to digest(laghu) with sweet (madhura) and bitter (tikta) rasa or taste. As children we’ve all been told that carrots are good for your eyes. But did you know that they’re good for your skin too? Here’s what carrots can do for your skin. They:

  • Provide nutrients that give you great skin: Carrots can give you two important nutrients that benefit your skin – beta carotene and vitamin C. Beta carotene present in carrots can offer protection against skin damage due to sunlight. Meanwhile, vitamin C helps stimulate the production of collagen, a protein that keeps your skin looking firm and young.[23]Stahl, Wilhelm, and Helmut Sies. “β-Carotene and other carotenoids in protection from sunlight.” The American journal of clinical nutrition 96, no. 5 (2012): 1179S-1184S. [24][Vitamin C and Skin Health](https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/health-disease/skin-health/vitamin-C “Vitamin C and Skin Health”). Oregon State University.
  • Helps rejuvenate skin: Carrot seed oil has traditionally been used to nourish and rejuvenate skin. Antioxidants present in carrot seeds are thought to help repair skin damage caused by free radicals. One study found that a cosmetic preparation containing carrot seed oil offered some degree of protection against skin damage caused by sun exposure and may help rejuvenate skin. However, it’s important to remember that carrot seed oil is not strong enough to replace a good sun screen.[25]Singh, Shalini, Alka Lohani, Arun Kumar Mishra, and Anurag Verma. “Formulation and evaluation of carrot seed oil-based cosmetic emulsions.” Journal of Cosmetic and Laser Therapy 21, no. 2 … Continue reading
How To Use Carrots
  • Make carrots a part of your diet to get its nutritional benefits. You can have them raw or add them to soups, stir fries, salads, and even a smoothie.
  • You can apply carrot seed oil to your skin after diluting it with a carrier oil such as grapeseed oil or coconut oil.
Precautions While Using Carrots
  • Having huge quantities of carrots can lead to a condition called carotenemia. This is a harmless condition where your skin gets a yellowish tinge. It tends to resolve itself soon after you stop eating carrots.[26][Carrot Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits](https://www.verywellfit.com/calories-in-carrots-3495643 “Carrot Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits”). Verywell fit.
  • Do test all new skin care ingredients for an allergic reaction on a small patch of skin before applying it to your face.

8. Gram Flour (Besan)

Gram flour or besan is prepared by grinding chickpeas into a fine powder. According to Ayurveda, it balances pitta and kapha dosha while increasing vata dosha. It

  • Works as a cleanser: Traditionally, gram flour has been used extensively as a body wash powder. In fact, many people use only gram flour for bathing babies because they don’t want to use chemical products.
How To Use Besan
  • Gram flour can be mixed with water and used as a cleanser.
  • For adults, it can also be mixed in a 1:1 ratio with beneficial herbal products such as sandalwood powder, manjistha, khadira, etc to make face packs.
  • For oily skin make a paste of red sandalwood powder, gram flour, and water. Apply this to your face and wash it off after 10-15 minutes for clean, refreshed skin.
Precaution While Using Besan
  • Do test all new skin care ingredients for an allergic reaction on a small patch of skin before applying it to your face.

9. Yogurt

Yogurt contains lactic acid which is an alpha hydroxy acid that’s widely used in skin care. It

  • Works as a gentle exfoliator and removes dead skin cells.
  • Lightens sun tans and darks spots
  • Eases wrinkles and fine lines
How To Use Yogurt
  • Prepare a face mask by adding a teaspoon of honey to ¼ of a cup of yogurt. Let the mask work for around 15 minutes before washing it off.[27][An Overview of Lactic Acid Skin Care]( https://www.verywellhealth.com/lactic-acid-skin-care-4178819 “An Overview of Lactic Acid Skin Care”). Verywell Health.
Precaution While Using Yogurt
  • Do test all new skin care ingredients for an allergic reaction on a small patch of skin before applying it to your face.

10. Papaya

Papayas can be diced into a salad or added to smoothies or soups for a great shot of flavor. According to ayurveda, they balance pitta and vata while increasing kapha dosha. This fruit:

  • Provides you with nutrients that support your skin: Papayas are a great source of vitamin C. And vitamin C plays a part in the production of collagen, a protein that’s needed for skin integrity and helps to keep it looking young. They’re also a good source of beta carotene – the same compound that’s present in carrots- which means they can offer protection against the damaging effects of the Sun.[28][ Papaya Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits]( https://www.verywellfit.com/papayas-nutrition-facts-calories-and-health-benefits-4114326 “Papaya Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits”). Verywell Fit. [29]Schweiggert, Ralf M., Rachel E. Kopec, Maria G. Villalobos-Gutierrez, Josef Högel, Silvia Quesada, Patricia Esquivel, Steven J. Schwartz, and Reinhold Carle. “Carotenoids are more bioavailable … Continue reading
  • May offer anti-aging properties: Papayas are rich in antioxidants and have anti-inflammatory properties. Experts suggest that since oxidative stress plays a significant role in the aging of skin papayas may be helpful in keeping your skin looking young.[30]Kong, Yew Rong, Yong Xin Jong, Manisha Balakrishnan, Zhui Ken Bok, Janice Kwan Kah Weng, Kai Ching Tay, Bey Hing Goh et al. “Beneficial Role of Carica papaya Extracts and Phytochemicals on … Continue reading
  • Works as an exfoliator: Papaya contains an enzyme called papain which helps to remove dead skin cells.[31]Charlotte Vohz. Naturally Georgeous. Ebury Press. 2007.
How To Use Papaya
  • Rub a slice of papaya over your skin and wait 5 minutes before rinsing it off for fresh, exfoliated skin.[32]Charlotte Vohz. Naturally Georgeous. Ebury Press. 2007.
  • Snack on this delicious fruit to benefit from the nutrients that it offers.
Precautions While Using Papaya
  • Some people are allergic to papayas. People who are allergic to foods like pistachios, cashew, or mango may also be allergic to papayas.
  • Do apply papaya flesh to a small area first to test if your skin reacts adversely to it before using it for exfoliation.

11. Acai Berry

Acai berries are native to South America and have quite a reputation as a ‘superfood’. These berries can also work wonders for your skin. They

  • Have an anti-aging effect on skin: UVA radiation from sunlight can induce cellular oxidative stress. This causes skin cells to age and is linked to many changes that we associate with aging skin such as wrinkles.[33][Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation](https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1011134417302610 “Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation”). American Cancer Society. One study found that an Acai extract was able to offer strong protection against UVA induced oxidative cells. Antioxidant compounds such as malvidin and cyanidin present in Acai berries are thought to be responsible for this effect. So, noshing on these berries can help prevent age related skin damage.[34]Petruk, Ganna, Anna Illiano, Rita Del Giudice, Assunta Raiola, Angela Amoresano, Maria Manuela Rigano, Renata Piccoli, and Daria Maria Monti. “Malvidin and cyanidin derivatives from açai fruit … Continue reading
  • Soothe allergic skin reactions: An allergic reaction can cause inflamed and irritated skin. But acai berries have anti-inflammatory properties and may be helpful here. According to a study, when rats were given acai oil, it significantly calmed the skin reaction they had due to an irritant. It has been found that acai oil can reduce your response to histamine, a chemical released by your body that is responsible for most of the symptoms that we experience during allergic reactions.[35]Favacho, Hugo AS, Bianca R. Oliveira, Kelem C. Santos, Benedito JL Medeiros, Pergentino JC Sousa, Fabio F. Perazzo, and José Carlos T. Carvalho. “Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive … Continue reading
How To Use Acai Berry
  • You can snack on fresh acai berries, or add them to a smoothie. [36][What are acai berries, and what are their possible health benefits?](https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/acai/faq-20057794 “What are acai … Continue reading
  • Prepare a face mask by mixing acai berry powder and a cup of mashed strawberries. Apply on damp, clean skin.
  • Acai oil can also be diluted with a carrier oil (for example, almond or coconut oil) and applied to moisturize your skin.
Precautions While Using Acai Berry
  • Always do a patch test on a small area of the skin to make sure you are not allergic to the ingredient.
  • Acai berries are typically safe to consume. However, we don’t have enough data on whether they’re safe for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Stay safe and avoid use, if either.
  • Check with your doctor before taking acai supplements, or if you plan on having larger quantities than are normally eaten as food.
  • Eating large quantities of acai berries before an MRI test can affect the results. Do let your doctor know if you’ve had acai berries before the test.[37][What are acai berries, and what are their possible health benefits?](https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/acai/faq-20057794 “What are acai … Continue reading

Ayurvedic guidelines for application of face packs (mukha lepa)

  • All lepa preparations are supposed to be used as soon as they are prepared. That is, they must be applied when they are fresh.
  • The lepa is supposed to be applied against the direction of hair growth for quicker and better absorption.
  • You should remove the lepa when it dries out as it loses its potency and may irritate your skin after it dries. To remove the lepa you should first moisten it with water. And after removal you should apply oil to your face.
  • You should not apply one lepa over another.
  • Mukha lepa should ideally be applied in the morning (around 20 mins before you have your bath, evening, or after you have digested food that has been previously consumed. They should not be applied at night or left on overnight.
  • People suffering from pinasa (rhinorrhea or runny nose), ajirna (indigestion), arochaka (anorexia), hanugraha (lock jaw) should not apply mukha lepa. You should also not use it immediately after nasya karma (using nasal drops) or after keeping awake the previous night (jagaran).

References

References
1 [ Atopic Dermatitis](https://www.niams.nih.gov/health-topics/atopic-dermatitis#tab-overview “Atopic Dermatitis”). National Institutes of Health.
2 Saeedi, Muadhamm, K. Morteza‐Semnani, and M‐R. Ghoreishi. “The treatment of atopic dermatitis with licorice gel.” Journal of Dermatological Treatment 14, no. 3 (2003): 153-157.
3 Yokota, Tomohiro, Hiroyuki Nishio, Yasuo Kubota, and Masako Mizoguchi. “The inhibitory effect of glabridin from licorice extracts on melanogenesis and inflammation.” Pigment cell research 11, no. 6 (1998): 355-361.
4 Raoufinejad, Kosar, and Mehdi Rajabi. “Licorice in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris and Postinflammatory Hyperpigmentation: A Review.” Journal of Pharmaceutical Care (2020).
5 Sumiyoshi, Maho, and Yoshiyuki Kimura. “Effects of a turmeric extract (Curcuma longa) on chronic ultraviolet B irradiation-induced skin damage in melanin-possessing hairless mice.” Phytomedicine 16, no. 12 (2009): 1137-1143.
6 Tu, Cai‐Xia, Mao Lin, Shan‐Shan Lu, Xiao‐Yi Qi, Rong‐Xin Zhang, and Yun‐Ying Zhang. “Curcumin inhibits melanogenesis in human melanocytes.” Phytotherapy Research 26, no. 2 (2012): 174-179.
7 Dueep Singh, John Davidson. Introduction to Ayurveda – Keeping Healthy the Ancient Way. Mendon Cottage Books. 2015
8 Kang, Su‑Jin, Beom‑Rak Choi, Seung‑Hee Kim, Hae‑Yeon Yi, Hye‑Rim Park, Chang‑Hyun Song, Sae‑Kwang Ku, and Young‑Joon Lee. “Beneficial effects of dried pomegranate juice concentrated powder on ultraviolet B-induced skin photoaging in hairless mice.” Experimental and therapeutic medicine 14, no. 2 (2017): 1023-1036.
9 Reilly, David M., and Jennifer Lozano. “Skin collagen through the lifestages: Importance for skin health and beauty.” Plastic and Aesthetic Research 8 (2021).
10 Henning, Susanne M., Jieping Yang, Ru-Po Lee, Jianjun Huang, Mark Hsu, Gail Thames, Irene Gilbuena et al. “Pomegranate juice and extract consumption increases the resistance to UVB-induced erythema and changes the skin microbiome in healthy women: A randomized controlled trial.” Scientific reports 9, no. 1 (2019): 1-11.
11 [What Is Pomegranate Juice?](https://www.verywellhealth.com/pomegranate-juice-may-interact-with-certain-medications-89171 “What Is Pomegranate Juice?”). Verywell Health.
12 Hasan, Noorul, Nesar Ahmad, Shaikh Zohrameena, Mohd Khalid, and Juber Akhtar. “Asparagus racemosus: For medicinal uses & pharmacological actions.” International Journal of Advanced Research 4, no. 3 (2016): 259-267.
13 Rungsanga, Tammanoon, Punpimol Tuntijarukornb, Kornkanok Ingkaninanc, and Jarupa Viyocha. “Stability and clinical effectiveness of emulsion containing Asparagus racemosus root extract.” Science Asia 41, no. 4 (2015): 236-245.
14 Therdphapiyanak, Narin, Montree Jaturanpinyo, Neti Waranuch, Lalana Kongkaneramit, and Narong Sarisuta. “Development and assessment of tyrosinase inhibitory activity of liposomes of Asparagus racemosus extracts.” asian journal of pharmaceutical sciences 8, no. 2 (2013): 134-142.
15 Phacharapiyangkul, Naphichaya, Krit Thirapanmethee, Khanit Sa-Ngiamsuntorn, Uraiwan Panich, Che-Hsin Lee, and Mullika Traidej Chomnawang. “Effect of sucrier banana peel extracts on inhibition of melanogenesis through the ERK signaling pathway.” International journal of medical sciences 16, no. 4 (2019): 602.
16 Albrecht, S., S. Jung, R. Müller, J. Lademann, T. Zuberbier, L. Zastrow, C. Reble, I. Beckers, and M. C. Meinke. “Skin type differences in solar‐simulated radiation‐induced oxidative stress.” British Journal of Dermatology 180, no. 3 (2019): 597-603.
17 Leerach, Nontaphat, Swanya Yakaew, Preeyawass Phimnuan, Wichuda Soimee, Wongnapa Nakyai, Witoo Luangbudnark, and Jarupa Viyoch. “Effect of Thai banana (Musa AA group) in reducing accumulation of oxidation end products in UVB-irradiated mouse skin.” Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology 168 (2017): 50-58.
18 Al-Yasiry, Ali Ridha Mustafa, and Bożena Kiczorowska. “Frankincense-therapeutic properties.” Advances in Hygiene & Experimental Medicine/Postepy Higieny i Medycyny Doswiadczalnej 70 (2016).
19 Thring, Tamsyn SA, Pauline Hili, and Declan P. Naughton. “Anti-collagenase, anti-elastase and anti-oxidant activities of extracts from 21 plants.” BMC complementary and alternative medicine 9, no. 1 (2009): 1-11.
20 Calzavara‐Pinton, Piergiacomo, Cristina Zane, Elena Facchinetti, Rossana Capezzera, and Alessandra Pedretti. “Topical Boswellic acids for treatment of photoaged skin.” Dermatologic therapy 23 (2010): S28-S32.
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Disclaimer: The information on this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. For more information pertaining to your personal needs please see a qualified health practitioner.

About the Author

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Dr. Manjula P. Badiger (KAA Expert)

Dr. Manjula has 12 years of experience in the field of Ayurveda and worked as a Consultant and General Physician for over 5 years before starting her private practice. In addition to BAMS, she also has an Advanced Diploma in Clinical Research and is trained in Panchkarma. She is an expert at diagnosis of the root cause and planning effective treatment for multiple issues.

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