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Benefits Of Abhyanga For Glowing Skin

Ayurveda considers abhyanga as an integral part of a healthy daily routine or dinacharya. Abhyanga provides protection from ailments linked to seasonal change, especially when the weather is cold and dry. It improves blood circulation and counters premature aging of the skin.

abhyanga for glowing skin
Noni-Ingredient-Kapiva

Who doesn’t enjoy a soothing massage? According to Ayurveda, a massage with oil or ghee – or abhyanga, as it’s called in this ancient science – is a must for those who desire happiness and health. In fact, it is considered to be an important part of the daily routine or dinacharya of a healthy person. Now that’s some ancient advice we can certainly get on board with!

Who Can Benefit From Abhyanga?

Ayurveda considers daily abhyanga important for all healthy people. If it’s not possible to have a whole-body massage then you are supposed to apply oil to at least important body parts like your head, foot, and ears daily in order to have a healthy life.[1]Roshy Joseph, C., C. Anu, and C. T. Joseph. “Role of Abhyanga (oil massage) to lead a healthy life.” Ayurpharm international journal of ayurveda and allied science 1, no. 7 (2012): … Continue reading

Abhyanga is also advised during the period when the seasons change. It is said to have a protective effect when the weather is cold and dry too.

How To Choose The Right Oil For Abhyanga?

Ayurveda suggests that three forces or doshas known as vatta, pitta, and kapha control your physiological and psychological processes. These doshas are associated with the elemental aspects of water, fire, space, earth, and air. Based on your physical and mental attributes you can discern which dosha is predominant in your constitution (prakruthi). The medium used for abhyanga is usually related to your body constitution.

  • Vata: is associated with the elements of air and space and exhibits the quickness and mobility of these elements. People with this constitution typically have dry skin. And heavier oils like sesame oil works well for them.
  • Pitta: is associated with the element of fire. People with this constitution typically have overheated or sensitive skin. Ghee and coconut oil are considered to be suitable mediums for them.
  • Kapha: is associated with the elements of earth and water and exhibits the solidity and stability of these elements. People with this constitution usually have oily skin and a light oil such as sweet almond oil is considered suitable for them. Generally, less oil is required for people with a kapha constitution.[2]Sharma, Shikha, Seema Puri, Taru Agarwal, and Vinita Sharma. “Diets based on Ayurvedic constitution–potential for weight management.” Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine … Continue reading

Sesame oil is considered good for all constitutions or prakruthis since it can balance all three doshas (tridoshagna). It is thought to be nourishing for the body. It contains linoleic acid which has potent anti-inflammatory effects and also inhibits harmful bacteria.

If your ayurvedic doctor recommends abhyanga for treating a specific condition, they might suggest that you use a medicated oil. Various medicated oils such as Triphaladi taila, Chandanadi taila, Bhringamalakadi taila, Ksheerabala taila etc. are used in Ayurveda for treatment.[3]Roshy Joseph, C., C. Anu, and C. T. Joseph. “Role of Abhyanga (oil massage) to lead a healthy life.” Ayurpharm international journal of ayurveda and allied science 1, no. 7 (2012): … Continue reading

What Are The Health Benefits Of Abhyanga?

Ayurvedic texts describe a range of benefits offered by abhyanga. It is thought to:

  • Improve blood circulation (rudhira – parivahaNa).
  • Counteract aging (jaraahara).
  • Promote relaxation by helping to relax your muscles (shramahara).
  • Help balance vata dosha (vatahara). Abhyanga soothes the nervous system which is governed by vata. It can therefore be helpful to people who tend to experience a lot of stress, are nervous, or travel a lot.[4]Roshy Joseph, C., C. Anu, and C. T. Joseph. “Role of Abhyanga (oil massage) to lead a healthy life.” Ayurpharm international journal of ayurveda and allied science 1, no. 7 (2012): … Continue reading
  • Improve eyesight (drishti prasadakara).
  • Nourish your body (pushtikara).
  • Improve your lifespan (ayushyakara).
  • Improve sound sleep (swapnakara).
  • Improve the health of your skin (twak dandhyakara).
  • Strengthen your body and help it tolerate adverse conditions (klesha sahatva).
  • Help you handle trauma without being affected too badly (abhighata sahatva).
  • Remove toxins and improve the strength and complexion of the body (mrujavarna balaprada).[5][Advantages Of Abhyanga (External Snehana)](http://www.ccras.nic.in/node/1025 “Advantages Of Abhyanga (External Snehana)”). Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences.

It is important to note that research suggests that massages can be helpful in managing conditions like anxiety, stress, insomnia, high blood pressure, and low back pain. Most of us experience a feeling of calmness and relaxation when we get a massage. This is due to the release of endorphins, which are neurotransmitters which give you a feeling of well being. A massage can also lower stress hormones like cortisol, adrenalin, and norepinephrine. It has also been found to offer a range of physical benefits such as reducing muscle tension, improving circulation, stimulating the lymphatic system, and improving joint flexibility as well as skin tone.[6][Massage](https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/massage “Massage”). Better Health Channel.

Benefits Of Abhyanga For Glowing Skin

  • Combats dryness.[ref][Advantages Of Abhyanga (External Snehana)]( http://www.ccras.nic.in/node/1025 “Advantages Of Abhyanga (External Snehana)”). Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences.[/ref]
  • Makes skin soft, strong, and supple.
  • Helps combat premature aging of skin.[7]Pachghare, Madhuri Anil, and Vd Priya Vishal Naik. “Role of Abhyanga in Skin and Hair Care.” Journal of Ayurveda and Integrated Medical Sciences 5, no. 04 (2020): 169-176.
  • May help treat vitiligo: In Ayurveda abhyanga with medicated oils like jyotishamati taila is considered to be helpful in treating vitiligo.[8]Kutiyal, Priya, Sanjay Gupta, Parul Sharma, and Lalita Sharma. “Role of jyotishamati taila abhyanga in the management of the shvitra WSR vitiligo: A clinical study.” Environment … Continue reading

How To Do Abhyanga?

  • Abhyanga can be performed when you’re sitting, or lying down. The position of the person being massaged can change based on the ease of applying oil. Abhyanga is done ideally in these positions- sitting, supine, right lateral, left lateral, prone, and supine again. Avoid abhyanga in a standing position.
  • The massage should be carried out in the direction of hair growth.
  • Early morning is best suited for abhyanga. It is best to receive a massage on an empty stomach after the food consumed the previous day has been properly digested.
  • Use warm oil for the massage.
  • Early morning massage should begin by gently applying slightly warmed oil on the scalp.
  • The flat surfaces of your fingers and the palms of your hands should be used to carry out the massage rather than the fingertips.
  • Use circular motions for massaging the joints and stimulating the energy points (marma points) that influence the entire body. You can use a straight motion while massaging the legs.
  • Use your fingers for massaging the face and ears and apply the flat surfaces of your open palms and fingers to the neck and upper back.
  • Ideally the back, spine, arms, and legs should be massaged vigorously but care should be taken based on the physical condition of the person.
  • Experts suggest that even a short 10 minute daily massage can be beneficial. However, your ayurvedic doctor may recommend a longer massage lasting between 30 to 60 minutes for treating certain disorders.
  • Finish off with a warm bath. But do keep in mind that experts suggest that you should wait at least 30 minutes after abhyanga before having a bath.[9]Roshy Joseph, C., C. Anu, and C. T. Joseph. “Role of Abhyanga (oil massage) to lead a healthy life.” Ayurpharm international journal of ayurveda and allied science 1, no. 7 (2012): … Continue reading

Precautions To Take For Abhyanga

Ayurvedic practitioners suggest that people suffering from certain disorders should not practice abhyanga:

  • Those suffering from disorders due to an imbalance in kapha.
  • Those suffering from indigestion or impaired digestion.
  • Those who have just undergone a shodhana or detoxification procedure.
  • Those suffering from fever.
  • Those suffering from conditions related to overeating.

You should also check with your doctor before getting a massage if you:

  • Are pregnant.
  • Have skin infections, rashes, or cuts.
  • Have broken bones.
  • Have a serious illness.[10][Massage](https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/massage “Massage”). Better Health Channel.

References

References
1, 3, 4, 9 Roshy Joseph, C., C. Anu, and C. T. Joseph. “Role of Abhyanga (oil massage) to lead a healthy life.” Ayurpharm international journal of ayurveda and allied science 1, no. 7 (2012): 163-167.
2 Sharma, Shikha, Seema Puri, Taru Agarwal, and Vinita Sharma. “Diets based on Ayurvedic constitution–potential for weight management.” Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine 15, no. 1 (2009): 44.
5 [Advantages Of Abhyanga (External Snehana)](http://www.ccras.nic.in/node/1025 “Advantages Of Abhyanga (External Snehana)”). Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences.
6, 10 [Massage](https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/massage “Massage”). Better Health Channel.
7 Pachghare, Madhuri Anil, and Vd Priya Vishal Naik. “Role of Abhyanga in Skin and Hair Care.” Journal of Ayurveda and Integrated Medical Sciences 5, no. 04 (2020): 169-176.
8 Kutiyal, Priya, Sanjay Gupta, Parul Sharma, and Lalita Sharma. “Role of jyotishamati taila abhyanga in the management of the shvitra WSR vitiligo: A clinical study.” Environment Conservation Journal 20, no. SE (2019): 53-56.

Disclaimer: The information on this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. For more information pertaining to your personal needs please see a qualified health practitioner.

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